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the-game-of-a-lannister:

Idris “Hot as Hell” Elba.

(via babyjeeves)

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fuckyeahmovieposters:

The Hateful Eight
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epicreads:

The new Graveyard Book Graphic Novel is all the things. (Photos by EpicReads. Awesome book by neil-gaiman.)

Oh sweet Gaiman Jesus I need this badly

(via neil-gaiman)

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jtotheizzoe:

A Typographical History of NASA

Data artists and visualization researchers at the Office for Creative Research dug through 11,000 pages of NASA history reports, containing nearly 5 million words, to assemble this typographical timeline of the U.S. space program.

The vertical waves represent the total NASA and percent of national budgets (which is why it begins to shrink toward the right side of the page). The most important words and phrases from each year are listed in lieu of traditional milestones, giving us a unique perspective on the key events that led us up up and away.

Tour the full-size, interactive visualization of NASA’s history here, it’s really something (and it’s also way too big for me to show you on my blog)

(via Popular Science)

(via wonder-fullmusings)

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Lauren Bacall by John Engstead

Lauren Bacall by John Engstead

(Source: deforest, via wonder-fullmusings)

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themuslimavenger:

Another Dose of Islamic Architecture

Clockwise from top left:

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engineeringhistory:

Depiction of a woman teaching geometry from a 1310 translation of Euclid’s Elements, initially written in 300 BC.

Alright, so this is actually pretty awesome. Quoting from the picture’s page on Wikimedia Commons:

In the Middle Ages, it is unusual to see women represented as teachers, in particular when the students appear to be monks. She is most likely the personification of Geometry, based on Martianus Capella’s famous book De Nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii, [5th c.] a standard source for allegorical imagery of the seven liberal arts. Illustration at the beginning of Euclid’s Elementa, in the translation attributed to Adelard of Bath.

The original manuscript belongs to the British Library (catalog entry Burney 275). Here’s the same image with surrounding context:

See how it’s actually drawn in the bowl of a ‘p’ at the beginning of a paragraph? The big letters at the beginning of paragraphs are called drop caps in modern terminology. Back in the Middle Ages, important manuscripts often contained these illuminations inside drop caps, which in this case are called historiated initials.
Judging from the pictures in the BL catalog, which show several illuminations and flourishes, and from the attribution of the work to the Méliacin Master, this was not a cheap book! Just imagine the insane amount of work that went into producing a whole manuscript illustrated in this manner, or even the single illustration here at such a small scale—at a time when glasses had barely been invented!

engineeringhistory:

Depiction of a woman teaching geometry from a 1310 translation of Euclid’s Elements, initially written in 300 BC.

Alright, so this is actually pretty awesome. Quoting from the picture’s page on Wikimedia Commons:

In the Middle Ages, it is unusual to see women represented as teachers, in particular when the students appear to be monks. She is most likely the personification of Geometry, based on Martianus Capella’s famous book De Nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii, [5th c.] a standard source for allegorical imagery of the seven liberal arts. Illustration at the beginning of Euclid’s Elementa, in the translation attributed to Adelard of Bath.

The original manuscript belongs to the British Library (catalog entry Burney 275). Here’s the same image with surrounding context:

See how it’s actually drawn in the bowl of a ‘p’ at the beginning of a paragraph? The big letters at the beginning of paragraphs are called drop caps in modern terminology. Back in the Middle Ages, important manuscripts often contained these illuminations inside drop caps, which in this case are called historiated initials.

Judging from the pictures in the BL catalog, which show several illuminations and flourishes, and from the attribution of the work to the Méliacin Master, this was not a cheap book! Just imagine the insane amount of work that went into producing a whole manuscript illustrated in this manner, or even the single illustration here at such a small scale—at a time when glasses had barely been invented!

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generalelectric:

At GE Global Research, a tube of almost pure quartz is heated to temperatures of around 1,700 degrees Celsius to create custom laboratory glassware. The material is then molded and tailored specifically to the experiment it’s being created for.

(via wonder-fullmusings)

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shychemist:

Forty years ago, a vast molten cavity known as the Darvaza crater – nicknamed the “door to hell” – opened up in the desert of north Turkmenistan, and has been burning ever since. Now, Canadian explorer George Kourounis has became the first to make the descent into the fiery pit to look for signs of life (x)

"We did find some bacteria living at the bottom that are very comfortable living in those high temperatures, and the most important thing was that they were not found in any of the surrounding soil outside of the crater," he says. "Outside of our solar system, there are planets that do resemble the conditions inside this pit, and [knowing that] can help us expand the number of places where we can confidently start looking for life outside of our solar system."

DUDE.

(via wonder-fullmusings)